Australian Solar Challenge Teams Prepare for Final Tests

The field of 22 solar cars will tomorrow undergo stringent speed and safety tests, before Sunday morning's official start to the event.

Published: 23-Sep-2005

Darwin’s Hidden Valley Raceway is the setting for final testing for participants in this year’s Panasonic World Solar Challenge.

The field of 22 solar cars will tomorrow undergo stringent speed and safety tests, before Sunday morning’s official start to the event.

Event Director Chris Selwood said the final checks and briefing session were vital to ensure all teams and drivers understood the Australian road rules and other event safety protocols before they set off on the 3021 kilometre journey from Darwin to Adelaide.

"Now that the teams have been through scrutineering, we need to make sure they understand the safety aspect of the event.  It’s a long way, through some harsh Australian Outback, so it is important everyone – particularly the international teams – know what procedures to follow," he said.

Qualifying begins at 8.30am at Hidden Valley Raceway, with a team briefing at 3pm.  The official start is on Sunday at 8am in State Square, Darwin, with leading cars possibly arriving in Adelaide as early as Wednesday afternoon.

This year’s event, the eighth since 1987, has attracted entries from corporations, universities, secondary schools and enthusiasts from all over the world. 

A Greenfleet Class, for vehicles that run on alternative fuels, has attracted a further nine entries.

The Panasonic World Solar Challenge is owned and managed by Australian Major Events, a division of the South Australian Tourism Commission.

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