Ocean Power's Promise Being Ignored by Government

Recent advancements in the technology indicate that with a relatively small investment from the government, wave energy could soon compete with other renewable sources, but the Bush Administration is about oil and coal.

Published: 28-Mar-2005

n waves provide a predictable source of energy that is easily tapped, and will likely have minimal impact on the environment, but the U.S. government is not pursuing this renewable resource.

Recent advancements in the technology indicate that with a relatively small investment from the government, wave energy could soon compete with other renewable sources.

Wave energy systems place objects on the water's surface that generate energy by rising and falling with the waves. The wave energy in turn moves a buoy or cylinder up and down, which turns a generator that sends the electricity through an undersea cable to a power station on the shore.

Several companies -- Ocean Power Delivery, AquaEnergy Group and Ocean Power Technology -- have developed prototype wave energy conversion systems that the companies say are ready to be deployed along United States coastlines.

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