New Johnson Control Battery Made for Hybrids

New nickel-hydride battery incorporates a more advanced design than the batteries used in busses and is targeted to meet the power needs of sport utility vehicles and hybrid models already on the market.

Published: 18-Jan-2005

Johnson Controls Inc. unveiled battery technology at the North American International Auto Show last week that positions the auto parts maker to take advantage of the growing market for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles.

Johnson Controls' 7.2-volt nickel-metal-hydride battery was developed using technologies from the company's Varta Battery Automotive Business in Europe, where buses have run on the supplier's nickel-hydride batteries for the past decade. "It's a new emphasis on our commitment to the hybrid market," said Lou Senunas, vice president of advanced battery and hybrid technology for Johnson Controls. "We intend to be a strong contender for this business."

Hybrid powertrains combine an electric motor with a gasoline engine to cut emissions and save fuel. Johnson Controls' new nickel-hydride battery incorporates a more advanced design than the batteries used in busses and is targeted to meet the power needs of sport utility vehicles and hybrid models already on the market.

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