Business Group Proposes Action Plan on Climate Change

Council for International Business (USCIB) urges the administration to move swiftly in developing an agenda for future talks that would address a wide range of energy, competitiveness and technology-related issues.

Published: 12-Apr-2001

NEW YORK, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- A leading U.S. business group has put forward the elements of a new framework for international negotiations on climate change. In a letter sent today to President Bush, the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) has urged the administration to move swiftly in developing an agenda for future talks that would address a wide range of energy, competitiveness and technology-related issues.

"We share your concern over the risks of climate change," writes USCIB president Thomas M.T. Niles. "The U.S. should move quickly to chart a path forward that will avoid the Kyoto Protocol's unrealistic targets, timetables and lack of developing country participation."

The Bush administration has indicated that the U.S. has no interest in pursuing the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, citing the treaty's unrealistic targets for reducing emissions of gases believed to contribute to global warming and the lack of developing-country participation. Mr. Niles said business supports an approach that avoids Kyoto's pitfalls while continuing to work within the established context of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, which the U.S. signed in 1992.

USCIB's climate action plan stresses the need to deal with the full range of suspected greenhouse gases and legitimate sequestration options. It proposes flexibility for countries to choose the most appropriate means to reduce emissions, as well as market incentives to facilitate least-cost options for improvement. And it endorses measures to support the development, commercialization and dissemination of new technologies to reduce emissions worldwide.

"This international action plan should focus on the long-term development, commercialization and global diffusion of advanced energy, carbon sequestration and adaptation technologies," writes Mr. Niles. "It should also take full advantage of appropriate market incentives and mechanisms, rather than mandated caps, targets, timetables and command and control regulations."

USCIB works to promote an open system of world trade, finance and investment in which business can flourish and contribute to economic growth, human welfare and protection of the environment. Its membership includes some 300 U.S. companies, professional services firms and associations. As the American affiliate of the International Chamber of Commerce, the Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD and the International Organization of Employers, USCIB presents business views to international policy makers and regulatory authorities worldwide. More information is available at http://www.uscib.org.

SOURCE United States Council for International Business

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