Fuel Cell Output to Multiply By Factor of 250 in Next Decade

Stationary fuel cell electricity generating capacity will jump to over 15,000 megawatts (MW) by 2010 from just 75 MW in 2001.

Published: 15-Mar-2001

OYSTER BAY, N.Y., March 14 /PRNewswire/ -- As the pressure for new energy sources increases, it is apparent that the fuel cell industry will greatly expand during this decade in order to meet some of the demand. The overall fuel cell energy generating capacity will increase by a factor of 250, according to Allied Business Intelligence's (ABI) findings.

"Fuel cell markets have attracted a great deal of attention in the last two years," said Atakan Ozbek, author of ABI's latest fuel cell study, "Stationary Fuel Cells: US and Global Early Market Opportunities." "However, the pressure on the fuel cell companies will be greater than ever before due to Wall Street's attention to fuel cells and the fuel cell industry's ability to deliver stationary fuel cell units on time," added Ozbek, ABI's Director of Energy Research.

According to ABI's findings, the global stationary fuel cell electricity generating capacity will jump to over 15,000 megawatts (MW) by 2010 from just 75 MW in 2001.

Stationary fuel cells are currently being readied for early deployment, in market segments from residential houses to high-end reliable power markets such as uninterruptible power systems for corporations.

ABI exposes early real and potential opportunities for markets that can see deployment from 50 Watts to 30 MW in the US and worldwide. While the US market will take the early lead, Germany and Japan are the other two giant markets that will realize early deployments.

Free fuel markets is an area with an early and large potential. One example is Fuel Cell Energy's King County Waste Water Treatment plant in Washington state, which will use waste gas from water treatment to supply energy for the surrounding communities. Fuel cell systems can use natural gas and propane, to provide the electricity, hot water and building heat to a wide range of end-users, such as single-family homes or large businesses. Recent developments such as California's current power problems will provide opportunities for the fuel cell industry to prove their product.

Summary discussions are provided of the current regulatory practices, tax practice environmental regulations and business considerations affecting the present and future uptake of fuel cell technologies. The report also examines the influences of legislation governing restructuring, net metering, privatization, carbon emissions and consumption of specific fuels, on a worldwide basis.

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