New Findings on Natural Hydrogen Cycle

Study finds soils may play key roll in absorbing any released hydrogen

Published: 22-Aug-2003

PASADENA, Calif.—Two months after a pivotal study on the potential impact of a future hydrogen economy on the environment, further evidence is emerging on what would happen to new quantities of hydrogen released into the atmosphere through human activity.

In an article appearing in the August 21 issue of the journal Nature, a group of researchers from the California Institute of Technology and other institutions reports results of a study of the atmospheric chemical reactions that produce and destroy molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere. Based on these results, the report concludes that most of the hydrogen eliminated from the atmosphere goes into the ground, and therefore that the scientific community will need to turn its focus toward soil destruction of hydrogen in order to accurately predict whether human emissions will accumulate in the air.

The researchers reached this conclusion through careful measurement of the abundance of a rare isotope of hydrogen known as deuterium. It has long been known that atmospheric molecular hydrogen is anomalously rich in deuterium, but it was unclear why. The only reasonable explanation seemed to be that atmospheric hydrogen is mostly destroyed by chemical reactions in the air, and that those reactions are relatively slow for deuterium-rich hydrogen, so it accumulates like salt in an evaporating pan of water.

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