SYNDICATED NEWS
PHOTO CAPTION: Tesla Supercharger Network in early 2014

Tesla's Game Changing Supercharger Network

Tesla plans to have 80% of US market covered in 2014 and 98% in 2015, undermining most of the arguments against electric cars.

Published: 14-Jan-2014

At least that's what the panelists of AOL Auto's "Technology of the Year" award said. The technology "ran away with votes for the award, clearly surpassing all of the other contenders." It would be tough to argue otherwise; the rapidly expanding network of electric-car charging stations for Tesla's (NASDAQ: TSLA ) vehicles is purposed to upend an antiquated industry. Tesla's mission is "to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport by brining compelling mass market electric cars to market as soon as possible" -- and its rapid expansion of its charging network shows just how seriously it's taking this mission.

Superior charging
Tesla's Superchargers aren't like the typical charging station. Despite the impressive EPA-rated range of 265 miles for the Model S, Superchargers will juice the vehicle to a 50% charge in just 20 minutes, or 80% in 40 minutes. They're roughly 16 times faster than the typical public charging station.

Tesla's innovation in its Supercharger network, however, goes beyond a fast charge. The company is piloting battery swapping at some of its Supercharger stations. The technology allows owners to swap out their used battery for a fully charged battery in less than 90 seconds -- all without getting out of the vehicle. Notably, Tesla may charge some owners a nominal fee for the swap, and they will eventually have to return for their original battery.

<< PREVIOUSNEXT >>
RELATED NEWS ITEMS

Tesla Model X's most unusual feature is its Falcon Wing rear doors.

First unveiled in 2012, the Model X makes its first appearance at the 2013 North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Tesla Model S production line in Fremont, California.

400 unit per week production is more than Mercedes-Benz or BMW sells of their flagship S Class and 7 Series cars respectively in the United States.

Tesla Model S showed rapid battery discharge rates driving along Interstate95 between Washington, D.C. and Norwich, Connecticut.

John Broder finds himself stalled short of a charging station in Connecticut in his first cross-country drive of a Tesla Model S.

READER COMMENTS

blog comments powered by Disqus