Graphene Paper Key to Fast Charging Lithium Battery

Engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute develop graphene anode material that can be charged or discharged 10 times faster than conventional graphite anodes used in today's lithium-ion batteries.

Published: 28-Aug-2012

Engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at troy, New York, made a sheet of paper from the world's thinnest material, graphene, and then zapped the paper with a laser or camera flash to blemish it with countless cracks, pores, and other imperfections.

The result is a graphene anode material that can be charged or discharged 10 times faster than conventional graphite anodes used in today's lithium (Li)-ion batteries.

Rechargeable Li-ion batteries are the industry standard for mobile phones, laptop and tablet computers, electric cars, and a range of other devices. While Li-ion batteries have a high energy density and can store large amounts of energy, they suffer from a low power density and are unable to quickly accept or discharge energy.

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