Tin-coated Resin Seen Extending Battery Life 20 Years

New approach keeps the tin inside the battery intact for much longer despite the strain caused by charging and recharging.

Published: 05-Feb-2010

Researchers at Japan's Eamex have discovered a technique that could dramatically extend the lifespan of lithium-ion batteries. The new approach keeps the tin inside the battery intact for much longer despite the strain caused by charging and recharging. By absorbing much of the stress through a new alloy in the tin-coated resin, the tin and the electrode structure are more stable and could last for as long as 20 years.

The figure is based on an assumption of about 10,000 complete recharges, or about 10 times more use many batteries today, including those for notebooks. Apple estimates that a MacBook or MacBook Pro battery can withstand about 1,000 cycles over about 5 years of constant use. Regular notebook batteries are estimated to last about 300 cycles.

Eamex plans to ship a battery with about 10,000W of power per kilogram (4,545W per pound) by the end of 2010 and expects the most use to come for vehicles like electric cars and scooters, where the need for a long-lasting battery is the most important. Such technology can scale down to smaller devices, however, and should be useful for storing energy from a home's solar power and could reach portable devices like notebooks.

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