EPA Unveils Stricter Smog Standards

The new limits would likely put hundreds more U.S. counties in violation of clean air standards.

Published: 07-Jan-2010

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed stricter standards for smog, which has been linked to a variety of health problems, including aggravated asthma and premature death from heart and lung disease.

The new standards, if adopted by the agency after a 60-day period of public comment, would replace controversial smog limits adopted during the last year of the administration of President George W. Bush that ran counter to scientific recommendations.

"EPA is stepping up to protect Americans from one of the most persistent and widespread pollutants we face," EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said in a news release issued Thursday morning. "Smog in the air we breathe poses a very serious health threat, especially to children and individuals suffering from asthma and lung disease. It dirties our air, clouds our cities, and drives up our health-care costs across the country. Using the best science to strengthen these standards is a long overdue action that will help millions of Americans breathe easier and live healthier."

<< PREVIOUSNEXT >>
RELATED NEWS ITEMS

Toyota Prius with solar panels on roof that provide 165 watts of power per hour, not enough to propel the car more than a couple miles.

Solar Electric Vehicles sells its version of a plug-in Prius, with a solar panel installed, for $25,000.

Solar Millennium's AnderSol-2 solar thermal project in Egypt.

Retrofitting existing power plants is a low-cost option for solar-thermal projects because the steam turbines that are needed come for free.

Professor David Banister

Travel growth in a car-dependent society must be confronted so that people travel less, not more, writes Oxford Professor of Transportation Studies at Oxford University, David Banister.

READER COMMENTS

blog comments powered by Disqus