Forecast: Small Cars Will Lead Demand

John LeBlanc gives his perspective on the immediate future of the automotive industry going into 2010.

Published: 02-Jan-2010

Eventually, historians will write that the past decade was one of the most tumultuous and significant eras in the auto industry.

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001; the roller-coaster of fuel prices; the public's growing environmental and road safety awareness; the rise of the Chinese automakers; the fall of the Detroit Big Three.

It all culminated in the final year of the last decade with one-time U.S. giants General Motors and Chrysler filing for bankruptcy protection and needing tens of millions of taxpayer dollars just to survive.

<< PREVIOUSNEXT >>
RELATED NEWS ITEMS

Toyota Prius with solar panels on roof that provide 165 watts of power per hour, not enough to propel the car more than a couple miles.

Solar Electric Vehicles sells its version of a plug-in Prius, with a solar panel installed, for $25,000.

Solar Millennium's AnderSol-2 solar thermal project in Egypt.

Retrofitting existing power plants is a low-cost option for solar-thermal projects because the steam turbines that are needed come for free.

Professor David Banister

Travel growth in a car-dependent society must be confronted so that people travel less, not more, writes Oxford Professor of Transportation Studies at Oxford University, David Banister.

READER COMMENTS

blog comments powered by Disqus