Life in 2030 New Zealand Will Include More Public Transport, Electric Bicycles

Liquid fossil fuels will be increasingly reserved for high-priority uses, meaning a greater reliance on public transport for longer urban trips.

Published: 31-Dec-2009

Electric-bicycle carts for our shopping and sail-assisted cargo ships for our exports are examples of transport innovations needed for New Zealand to survive a looming oil supply squeeze.

Dwindling supplies by 2030 will put pressure on indigenous transport energy sources - notably hydro-electricity, wind power and biofuels - to keep us moving.

Liquid fossil fuels will be increasingly reserved for high-priority uses such as wholesale food distribution, meaning a greater reliance on public transport for longer urban trips and "personal mobility" vehicles such as battery-powered Segways, bikes or small electric cars for neighbourhood errands.

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