New STOBA Cathode Aims to Make Lithium Batteries Safer

New polymer suppresses thermal heat in case of a puncture or other severe damage in the cell that can lead to thermal runaway.

Published: 25-Sep-2009

A new material developed by Taiwanese researchers aims to put an end to fires and explosions caused by the lithium-ion batteries commonly found in phones and other mobile devices.

Lithium-ion technology is used in batteries for most electronic devices today, from iPods and the iPhones to laptops, digital cameras and more. The technology has been considered safe for years, but damage and production defects have led to high profile fires and small explosions. A few years ago, several laptop battery fires prompted Sony to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on a massive lithium-ion battery recall.

This same battery technology is now being used in hybrid vehicles and electric cars.

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