Toyota Continues Its Focus on NiMH Batteries

The leading car manufacturer currently focuses on NiMH batteries as standard power source for hybrid vehicles and enhances in further development.

Published: 26-Jan-2009

Nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries will not be replaced by lithium-ion batteries, stated Kazuhiko Miyadera, Senior Vice President, Research and Development Toyota Motor Europe, on the occasion of the Toyota Technology Seminar in Frankfurt. "Battery technology stays the greatest challenge for the progress in hybrid development", he explained. The leading car manufacturer currently focuses on NiMH batteries as standard power source for hybrid vehicles and enhances in further development.

Toyota strives for the goal to sell one million hybrid vehicles annually in the 2010s and plans to employ hybrid technology in all vehicles in the line-up in the 2020s. According to Miyadera this goal requires improvements in the performance and fuel efficiency of the hybrid systems, especially a reduction of their size, weight and cost. "We are currently proceeding with development to achieve our goal of creating a hybrid system that is a quarter the size, weight and cost of the system employed in the first-generation Prius", he explained.

For the Japanese car manufacturer, plug-in hybrid vehicles represent the most realistic approach because they can be used as electric vehicles for short trips and as normal hybrid vehicles for longer distances. Miyadera announced that the next generation of the Prius being launched in 2009 will be equipped with NiMH batteries.

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