IRS Offers No Incentives to Make Cars Greener

Although the government provides tax breaks for hybrids and alt-fuel vehicles produced by major automakers, it doesn't provide any relief to those who make their existing cars greener.

Published: 19-Jan-2009

For all the hype about hybrids and electric cars, the best way to reduce our carbon footprint is to make the cars we're already driving more efficient. But switching a vehicle to alternative fuels or getting a plug-in hybrid conversion is expensive, and the IRS, foolishly, doesn't cut you any slack for it.

Although the government provides tax breaks for hybrids and alt-fuel vehicles produced by major automakers, it doesn't provide any relief to those who make their existing cars greener. "There are no incentives for the 248 million vehicle owners in the United States to convert their vehicles into cleaner, greener plug-in hybrids," says Frank Kuchinski of Poulsen Hybrid, one of a growing number of companies doing such conversions.

Such a policy is short-sighted, given the emphasis lawmakers put on easing our dependence on foreign oil and the urgent need to address global warming. It must be changed.

<< PREVIOUSNEXT >>
RELATED NEWS ITEMS

Neil Young's converted 1959 Lincoln Continental gets 65 mpg in informal testing.

Neil Young on his 1959 Lincoln Continental conversion dubbed the Lincvolt.

READER COMMENTS

blog comments powered by Disqus