Automakers Learning to Tell Electric Car Story

According to a Morpace Omnibus Study this July, 62% of consumers expect their next vehicle to be smaller or more fuel-efficient than their current one.

Published: 03-Oct-2008

Automakers are handling myriad issues – changing consumer demand, rising costs, layoffs – but perhaps none as important as convincing its stakeholders that its next-generation, electric cars will take them out of an old, bad-news era and into a brighter, more successful, green-tinged one.

Consumers hit with record gas prices, economic uncertainty, and greater cultural concern for the environment certainly appear to be clamoring for more fuel-efficient models. According to a Morpace Omnibus Study this July, 62% of consumers expect their next vehicle to be smaller or more fuel-efficient than their current one.

The federal government also expects automakers to employ better fuel standards by 2020 in order to meet its stringent Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. Just two weeks ago, Congress approved a $25-billion low-interest loan for auto manufacturers to assist with the production of more fuel-efficient vehicles.

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