Honda FCX Clarity Impresses

The Japanese company is so committed to fuel cell technology that it expects to be building 400,000 such cars a year by 2020.

Published: 05-Jan-2008

If you had no idea what powered Honda’s FCX Concept, it would still be a great car. Drive it under the illusion that a super-quiet diesel or petrol engine was tucked under the bonnet and you could not help but be impressed. When you realise it runs on electricity generated by its oxygen and compressed hydrogen fuel cell, and that the only emission is water, the car becomes all the more significant.

“It is a matter of when, not if, fuel cell cars come to the UK,” a Honda spokesman said. “We have experimented with other technologies including hybrid cars and that only convinced us that ultimately hydrogen fuel cells are the long-term solution.”

The Japanese company is so committed to fuel cell technology that it expects to be building 400,000 such cars a year by 2020. The FCX Concept is almost identical (the bumpers will change) to the version that will go on sale in Japan and America next year. This is a four-door saloon with a hint of rakish Aston Martin styling at the back, a glimpse of Lamborghini in the short, blunt nose, all part of a sleek, smooth and purposeful package.

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