Rochester Institute of Technology Expert on FreedomCAR Initiative

Nabil Nasr sees greater opportunities for recycling and remanufacturing in fuel cell vehicles.

Published: 05-Feb-2002

ROCHESTER, N.Y., -- This month, the Bush administration committed to help fund the development of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles. The aim: replacing today's combustion-driven engines with environmentally friendly, efficient, cleaner fuel cells.

The new program replaces the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, started in 1994 by former Vice President Al Gore. Its purpose was to create an affordable family sedan that could get 80 miles per gallon.

Nabil Nasr, director of the National Center for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery (NCR3) at Rochester Institute of Technology, worked with the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles in the area of recycling and remanufacturing.

Nasr will continue to work with the new program, dubbed the Freedom CAR. "I expect that my involvement in the area of recycling and remanufacturing research for fuel-cell cars will be even bigger as there are more opportunities for that with this new technology," Nasr says.

Argonne National Lab and NCR3 have developed a proposal for a National Center for Material Recovery and Recycling. The proposal addresses the challenges outlined by the task force, Nasr says. Among the challenges of next generation vehicles is their recycling ratio.

The recycling ratio of today's cars is close to 75 percent, Nasr says. "We have been challenging the auto industry to increase this ratio to 95 percent. The next generation cars will have much lower recycling ratio than today's cars if we don't incorporate the recyclability and remanufacturability consideration into the design phase."

NCR3 has also worked with a fuel-cell company in areas that deal with fabrication and manufacturing of the system. NCR3 is a unit of RIT's Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies, a world-class organization with a mission to increase the competitiveness of United States manufacturers through applied technology and training.

Founded in 1829, RIT is internationally recognized as a leader in computing, engineering, imaging, technology, fine and applied arts, and education for the deaf. RIT enrolls 15,000 students in more than 240 undergraduate and graduate programs. For the past decade, U.S. News & World Report has ranked RIT as one of the nation's leading comprehensive universities. RIT is also included in Yahoo! Internet Life's Top 100 Wired Universities, Fisk's Guide to America's Best Colleges and Barron's Best Buys in Education.

The National Center for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery (NCR3) is the nation's leading center for applied research and development in remanufacturing, helping remanufacturing and resource recovery industries improve productivity, reliability and processes without harming the environment. With its advanced proven technologies and hands-on experience, NCR3 is uniquely capable of developing the innovative and concrete solutions needed to take remanufacturing and resource recovery industries to the cutting edge. NCR3 is a part of the Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS).

CIMS at Rochester Institute of Technology is a world-class organization with a mission to increase the competitiveness of United States manufacturers through applied technology and training. Established in 1992, CIMS provides technology and workforce development solutions that strengthen industrial clients' ability to compete in the global marketplace. CIMS business units also include Corporate Education and Training, the Printing Applications Laboratory, and the Center for Excellence in Lean Enterprise. CIMS represents a dynamic collaboration of in-house technical experts, as well as academic, industry and government resources.

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