Solar Power Eliminates Utility Bills in U.S. Home

Strizki runs the 3,000-square-foot house with electricity generated by a 1,000-square-foot roof full of photovoltaic cells on a nearby building, an electrolyzer that uses the solar power to generate hydrogen from water, and a number of hydrogen tanks that store the gas until it is needed by the fuel cell.

Published: 18-Jan-2007

EAST AMWELL, New Jersey (Reuters) - Michael Strizki heats and cools his house year-round and runs a full range of appliances including such power-guzzlers as a hot tub and a wide-screen TV without paying a penny in utility bills.

His conventional-looking family home in the pinewoods of western New Jersey is the first in the United States to show that a combination of solar and hydrogen power can generate all the electricity needed for a home.
The Hopewell Project, named for a nearby town, comes at a time of increasing concern over U.S. energy security and worries over the effects of burning fossil fuels on the climate.

"People understand that climate change is a big concern but they don't know what they can do about it," said Gian-Paolo Caminiti of Renewable Energy Associates, the commercial arm of the project. "There's a psychological dividend in doing the right thing," he said.


Solar charging panels are built into the wheels.

Ferry operator Hornblower Cruises and Events won the contract for the Alcatraz Island tour with its bid to incorporate wind and solar power into a diesel ferry that also has electric motors.

Down under, they're all over alternative energy - starting with a 1,600-foot tall 'solar tower' that can power a small city.


blog comments powered by Disqus