American Carnakers Want Money for Electric Car Batteries

The suggestion to triple the money allocated for advanced battery research was sent to the White House in December, about a month after the heads of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and the Chrysler Group met with President George W. Bush for an hour in the Oval Office.

Published: 10-Jan-2007

Detroit automakers have suggested that the Bush administration triple money devoted to battery research and give incentives for building electric vehicle batteries in the United States, company executives said Tuesday.

The suggestions were sent to the White House in December, about a month after the heads of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and the Chrysler Group met with President George W. Bush for an hour in the Oval Office. Officials said that conversation included a discussion of what the government could do to speed basic research into batteries.

Such batteries will play an important role in the fortunes of Detroit automakers, judging by the vehicles unveiled over the past few days at the Detroit auto show. GM, Ford and DaimlerChrysler are studying versions of gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles that could be recharged by plugging into wall outlets, and GM's Chevrolet Volt electric car concept uses even more advanced technology to provide up to 40 miles of electric-only driving.

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