Is Automaker Hybrid Buzz Just 'Vaporware'?

Industry analysts say automakers won't have significant numbers of alternative-energy vehicles -- hybrids, diesels and plug-ins -- for sale until well after the turn of the decade.

Published: 08-Jan-2007

WASHINGTON -- With great hoopla, automakers will unveil futuristic prototypes this week at the Detroit auto show, including advanced hybrids and a gas-electric sports car, the FT-HS, from Toyota.

The only problem is that some of the technology being touted exists only as fancy fiberglass models.

The buzz machine shifts into high gear Sunday with carmakers competing to demonstrate their concern about high gas prices, U.S. dependence on foreign oil and global warming. But despite all the glitz, what Americans will drive in the next few years will look a lot like what they drive today. Industry analysts say automakers won't have significant numbers of alternative-energy vehicles -- hybrids, diesels and plug-ins -- for sale until well after the turn of the decade.

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